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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
of the united states of america to be left almost alone in the united nations against so many other countries, including the best trends of america to defend the state of israel and then to find out the next morning that israel is doing something which america explicitly is against i think you'd have been thinking twice about his position and therefore i think it was a mistake. i think we should have manifested a much greater understanding for the sensitivities of the united states and i criticize it -- >> rose: so the prime minister -- >> i think it was not the right thing to do. >> rose: when you looked a hamas have they been strengthened by this? >> well, their status, i think, has changed to the degree that at the final point of negotiations, the appearance was that the u.n. secretary general, the u.s. secretary of state, the president of egypt and a few more foreign ministers all came in a way to save hamas and the islamic jihad. now, this is rather strange that two terrorist organizations which are involved almost endlessly in killing innocent people which are exercising the most author
the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. >> people buy a dickens' novel they imagine of course that that's how they were written. but they weren't. they were written month by month. was it particular to dickens? >> it was really dickens who pioneered this and was the most successful perpetrator, if you will, of publishing in installments. >> i guess you're saying that
than ever before. >> rose: you're bullish on america? >> i think on the energy side for sure. and i'd say on the -- the one thing that never goes away in the united states is the incredible accept of entrepreneurs. so i think if we can get a set of great entrepreneurs, we can go after some big opportunities like energy. there's no reason why the united states can't continue to grow. >> rose: can manufacturing come back to america? >> if you looked -- i'm 30 year g.e. guy. so when i started it was probably 25% of american jobs were manufacturing, now it's 9%. so it is going to go back to be 25% again? probably not. could it be in the low teens? yes. >> rose: apple just announced today -- >> i saw that. i saw what tim did. we brought jobs back to the united states. i think american work force is very productive. i think in the sets of technologies that we make today you can make them here. i actually think that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the
they doing. you have america the most powerful nation in the planet and you have this guy. i take people behind the scenes to see whattate would be like to be an officer and what it would be like to be tracking osama, and me you did it. >> rose: kathryn bigelow and mark boal coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the resul
forward to an america that will not be afraid of grace and bite. i look forward to an american that will honor achievement in the arts, the way we honor achievement in business or state craft. and that's what the kennedy center honors are. >> we conclude this evening with the stars and director of the new film, this is 40. joining us paul rudd, leslie mann and judd apatow. >> i think it is a couple that my own opinion is that they love each other and they're deal well problems that a lot of marriages deal with. and maybe they're just handling it in the wrong way sometimes. and i think they're kind of succumbing to the pressures of all of it. >> like paul said we kind of share a brain and so we, you know, we have a shorthand with each other, with all of it. and we have i mean we're constantly having conversations about what we are-- about screens and these characters. >> it is person. we debate all the time how truthful it is, and how personal it is. and some days it is like this is really personal, this isn't like us at all. so we change our opinion moment to moment,. >> rose:
philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about
,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences around the country. and it doesn't grab the public's imagination, psyche, sympathy, there's just-- you don't get a visceral reaction when it's people you don't know and can't see. >> rose: have we got that now, the visceral reaction that this is somehow different because it children. >> i sure hope so i was asked today is it different with children. it is in the public psyche. but i think if you talk to the families of teenagers and even adults who were killed before the sympathyes with their loss is exactly the same as the parents of young people. but young people that people look and say oh my god what are we really doing here. >> rose: what is your criticism of the president of the united states? >> well, i don't know that criticism is the right word. i believe that his job is to lead. when you
. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewrite
in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of five an ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them. birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women without devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. for the parents and grandparents, sisters and brothers of these little children, and for the families of the adults who were lost. our hearts are broken for the parents of the survivors as well. for as blessed as they are to have their children home tonight, they know that their children's innocence has been torn away from them too early. and there are no words that will ease their pain. as a country we have been through this too many times. whether it's in elementary school in newton or a shopping mall in oregon or a temp el in wisconsin, or a movie these never aurora or a street corner in chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods. and these
to go into the bleakest time of america's history, the truly-- the biggest sin that the country committed and the sin that we're still paying for to this day, we haven't gotten past the sin. part of the reason we haven't gotten past it is we have to almost lie about it, lie by omission. and i wanted to throw out there on the table. i wanted to take a modern-day audience and stick them in the antebellum south and see what america america was like at that time in that part country. and deal-- now, i want to do it in an entering way, and me the way to do that is to do it as a genre pies because it seems like most of the time-- whenever it has been dealt with, at least in the last 30 years or 40 years, it's been either historical with a capital "h" which i think kind of put it at an arm's distance, kinds of puts it a little bit under class, to observe and here are the facts. and we all know the facts, more or less, or there's been movies like, "mandingo" or "good-bye uncle tom" which in many ways i think are much clorls to the truth than the capital "h"movies. so i wanted to do it l
they do. >> you know, we do exaggerate in america all the time. so now we are locavore, you know local food and now we get totally crazy with organic to the point where i have been to restaurants where they practically come and introduce you to the carrot. that carrot was born on the 7th of may, we named it hilda. we can get exaggerated. too. >> rose: great chefs for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest
's illustrated magazine, it's america's test kitchen with your host christopher kimball, featuring test kitchen chefs julia collin davison, bridget lancaster, becky hays, with adam ried in the equipment corner and jack bishop in the tasting lab. discover the secrets of america's foremost food testers and tasters, today on america's test kitchen. today on america's test kitchen, julia uncovers the secrets to grilled, smoked, roasted whole chicken, and serves it with salt baked potatoes. next, adam reveals his pick for the perfect cooler in the
in a buckminster fuller geo december i can dome in a theme about a show thematically called "creative america." so they were very brightly colored. had to be seen from a large distance. but i feel that they have such a spectacular impact in terms of introducing the whole idea of the show, of regarding -- he is regarding us. he is the great regarder, if you will. he was the voyeur, they was receiver. and he is looking at us. but in this very enigmatic portrait where he's half covered in shadow. his hands in front of his face. so many of his depictions, warhol said "i paint myself to make sure i'm still here." and he's one of his favorite subjects but often his face is obscured. he's wearing sunglasses, he's wearing a wig, he's wearing makeup. so it introduces warhol, i think in the best possible way. >> and you can't go wrong with portraits. (laughter) >> rose: says from the master. let's see the next image. >> well, this is one of the images taken from the newspaper of a nose job, an ad for nose jobs and warhol himself had a nose job and he was obsessed by his own apparent appearance. but this int
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)